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DateEvent
06 November 2018London's Sacred Palaces: St Pauls and Westminster Abbey
13 March 2018'How is it made?' A Close Look at Silver with a Huguenot Perspective'
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08 November 2016Bankrolling the Renaissance - a History of the Medici Family of Florence
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London's Sacred Palaces: St Pauls and Westminster Abbey Caroline MacDonald-Haig Tuesday 06 November 2018

DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THIS SPECIAL INTEREST DAY HAD TO BE CANCELLED.

Caroline is a Design and Decorative arts journalist and author. Her specialist subjects include London's history, galleries, museums and architecture.  She is a London Blue Badge Guide.

Why Sacred Palaces?

St Paul's Cathedral houses the throne, from the Latin for seat - cathedra - of the Bishop of London.

Westminster Abbey houses the coronation chair, the ceremonial seat for the enthronement of our monarchs since the early 14th century.

Between the two the history of our national life can be traced in a most poetic way.

St Paul's Cathedral

Sir Christopher Wren's masterpiece stands on the site of the first cathedral founded in AD 604. The first dome to be built in England, it dominates the City of London and is Britain's focus in times of celebrations, thanksgiving and mourning.   It has also seen the great state funerals of Britain's heroes: Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Winston Churchill.

Westminster Abbey

The Abbey has been at the centre of the life of our Monarchy for nearly 1000 years. Begun for the Benedictine monks in the mid 11th centruy by the saintly King Edward the Confessor it was rebuilt in the gothic style by King Henry 111 in the 1200s.  Every monarch has been crowned in the Abbey since William the Conqueror's coronation on Christmas Day in 1066.